Commercial Licence
Marketing (inc editorial)

All Editorial & Personal Uses

  • Single use
  • Personal use
  • Editorial: Print, online, broadcast
  • In-house business editorial
  • Corresponding online/offline content trails & social media
  • Any placement
  • Any size & DPI
  • Unlimited Distribution
  • No licence expiration

Marketing

  • Single use or campaign
  • Advertorial, promoted & "sponsored by" content
  • Newsletters & email marketing
  • Website backgrounds & collateral
  • Social media
  • Social media advertising & promoted posts
  • Brochures & leaflets
  • All promotional materials
  • Unlimited sizes, distribution, placement, perpetuity
  • One time licence transfer

Advertising & Merchandising

View full licence

Editorial & Personal Licence
Editorial & personal

All Editorial & Personal Uses

  • Single use
  • Personal use
  • Editorial: Print, online, broadcast
  • In-house business editorial
  • Corresponding online/offline content trails & social media
  • Any placement
  • Any size & DPI
  • Unlimited Distribution
  • No licence expiration

Marketing

Advertising & Merchandising

View full licence

Advertising Licence
Advertising & products

All editorial & personal uses

Marketing

Advertising & Merchandising

  • Single use or single campaign
  • Print advertising
  • Out-of-home advertising
  • Broadcast advertising
  • Display advertising
  • Multi-channel advertising
  • Merchandising
  • Retail product packaging
  • One time licence transfer
View full licence

Download Confirmation

I agree that this image is for layout purposes only. To license for full use, please add to your bill.

Ok Cancel
"Himba Couple, Iona Village, Angola" stock image

DIGITAL DOWNLOAD

Editorial & personal

Editorial

£71.55

Choose New Licence(s)

  • Editorial Licence

    Editorial use - print, online, and broadcast; personal use. Read more

  • Commercial Licence

    Editorial use; personal use; promotional and marketing use; advertorial and social media. Read more

  • Commercial Licence and Advertising Licence

    Commercial: Editorial use; personal use; promotional and marketing use; advertorial and social media. Read more

    Advertising: Print advertising, out-of-home advertising, broadcast advertising, & display advertising; merchandising and retail product packaging. (10x price) Read more

  • Cancel

    If you wish Picfair to perform this action in bulk for all of your images, please contact us

Confirm New Licence(s)

  • I confirm that:

    contributor agreement(s)

  • Cancel

    If you wish Picfair to perform this action in bulk for all of your images, please contact us

Caption

Iona village, Angola Himbas are a bantu ethnic group. These nomadic pastoralists live mainly in Namibia but also in south Angola, crossi...

Dimensions

4961 x 3508 pixels
EricLafforgue Eric Lafforgue, Toulouse
52200 photos
Views
Title Himba Couple, Iona Village, Angola
Caption Iona village, Angola Himbas are a bantu ethnic group. These nomadic pastoralists live mainly in Namibia but also in south Angola, crossing the borders without any visas. In Angola, most of them live in remote areas, far from the towns, and are not spoiled by modernity, whereas in Namibia the ones that settled in the north of the city of Opuwo, are in touch with the modern world. Bodypainting and hairstyle Himba women are famous for covering their body and hair with a paste made of butter, ochre (hematite powder) and ashes, called otjize, which is supposed to protect them from the sun and the insects. The red complexion it gives to women’s skin, is considered a sign of beauty. Body decoration is important in Himba culture, especially for women. They wear jewelry made of shell, metal, bone or skin. Women usually go topless (as well as men) and wear a skirt made of goat skin. Adult women also wear heavy iron or copper necklaces, that can weigh several kilos, and beaded anklets to protect their legs from venomous animal bites. Himba dress codes and hairstyle rules are very complex. Himba hairstyles are really meaningful as they enable to identify their social status.  Pre-pubescent girls wear 2 plaits in front of their faces. Replacing them with many strands hanging all over the head, means the girl is in her puberty period.  A girl with long tied back braids is considered ready for marriage.  Once married, an « erembe » (a piece of goat leather) is tied to the top of her head. Hairstyle also indicates the status of men.  Single men are recognizable by the single plait on the back of their head (called an « ondatu ») with the rest of the head being shaved. Men having 2 plaits are suitable for marriage. When a man has a turban style hairdo it means he is married. If a kid has a single plait in front of his face, it means he is a twin.
Image dimensions 4961 x 3508 pixels
Camera Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III
Tags
two